quarta-feira, 31 de janeiro de 2018

Porque a Terra é redonda: «All roads are now bent»

De acordo com Tolkien:

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«Faced by this rebellion, of appalling folly and blasphemy, and also real peril (...) the Valar lay down their delegated power and appeal to God, and receive the power and permission to deal with the situation; the old world is broken and changed (...). Thereafter there is no visible dwelling of the divine or immortal on earth. Valinor (or Paradise) and even Eressëa are removed, remaining only in the memory of the earth. Men may sail now West, if they will, as far as they may, and come no nearer to Valinor or the Blessed Realm, but return only into the east and so back again; for the world is round, and finite, and a circle inescapable – save by death. Only the 'immortals', the lingering Elves, may still if they will, wearying of the circle of the world, take ship and find the 'straight way', and come to the ancient or True West, and be at peace».
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J. R. R. Tolkien, Preface to The Silmarillion - A letter to Milton WaldmanCf. J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, London, HarperCollinsPublishers, 1999 (1.ª ed. 1977), p. xxiii.
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Frédéric Bennett, Haven of the Eldar
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Contudo, alguns, mesmo entre os mortais, conseguem encontrar o caminho recto que permite alcançar Avalon: 
«Therefore the loremasters of Men said that a Straight Road must still be, for those that were permitted to find it. And they taught that, while the new world fell away, the old road and the path of the memory of the West still went on, as it were a mighty bridge invisible that passed through the air of breath and of flight (which were bent now as the world was bent), (...) until it came to Tol Eressea, the Lonely Isle, and maybe even beyond, to Valinor, where the Valar still dwell and watch the unfolding of the story of the world. And tales and rumours arose along the shores of the sea concerning mariners and men forlorn upon the water who, by some fate or grace or favour of the Valar, had entered in upon the Straight Way (...) and so had come to the lamplit quays of Avallone.
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J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, London, HarperCollinsPublishers, 1999 (1.ª ed. 1977), p. 338.

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